Thursday, January 28, 2010

Media Spotlight—Acrylic Painters 2010


Every month or so, Gallery at Marina Square, highlights a group of artists, working in a particular type of medium. This month we are highlighting the Acrylic painters: Jeanne Bauer, Deb Festa, Galen Griswold, Deborah Kyle Hintergardt, Gilmer Alvarez Maluyao, Hope Myers and Ardella Swanberg.



Deb Festa—Acrylic Painting

Deb Festa

Deb Festa loves bright colors! One of the reasons she likes to paint with acrylic, is that she can get bright, beautiful colors. “You can pile on the layers with acrylic and get a completely different look than watercolors. I like to paint with acrylics on canvas, paper, wood boxes and rocks.” Deb explains that if she makes a mistake with acrylic, she can paint over it and start over if necessary. Deb also likes acrylic as she can exhibit her large paintings outside during trade shows events.

Colors of the Bay © Deb Festa



Galen Griswold—Acrylic Painting

Vineyard Road © Galen Griswold

The Dean of Galen’s graduate school suggested that along with a professional career one must find a connection with culture. For Galen, painting became that connection.

Galen studied at Alameda College and San Francisco Art Institute.

His art has emerged through experimentation and a deep appreciation for the work of others.

Galen loves acrylic painting with its quick drying properties and the freedom to splash on the color. He paints with rapid brush strokes that fly across the canvas. Galen loves the environment before him as the energy, color and light resonate from within.

As the paint flows, the canvas begins to tell its own story.

Montana De Oro © Galen Griswold
Dancing Wave © Galen Griswold



Deborah Kyle Hintergardt—Acrylic Painting

Deborah Kyle Hintergardt

Deborah Hintergardt loves to paint with acrylic paint. She loves that it is clean, neat, quick drying, durable, non toxic and the colors are absolutely vibrant. Deborah explains that she can pile on the paint thick or skim it on thin. She can layer it fairly quickly and if not quickly enough as she claims to be quite impatient, can pull out her trusty blow dryer to get the job done! She especially enjoys painting in acrylic on wood panel, you will see nothing but luscious paint and juicy brushstrokes, no dull, dry, canvas weave. A quick application of gloss varnish brings a sparkle and a luster to her paintings and they literally seem to come to life.

Whisper © Deborah Hintergardt
Carizzo Sheds © Deborah Hintergardt



Hope Myers—Acrylic Painting

Hope Myers

Hope Myers is an award-winning artist who paints watercolors and makes one-of-a-kind jewelry in her “An Artist’s Garden” studio in Los Osos, California. She began to work with art forms as a child and continued her interests through a B.A. degree in Wisconsin with a minor in Art History.

In California, Hope has extended her fine arts studies through academic classes at Cal Poly - San Luis Obispo, and professional workshops with Robert Reynolds, Helmuth Wegner, Kolan Peterson, Tom Lynch, and others.

Her primary medium is transparent watercolor. Using vibrant colors in sometimes unusual combinations; in clean and at times simple settings, she emphasizes her love for the beauty
of living things and outdoor scenes that can brighten our lives.

Morro Rock © Hope Myers
Morro Bay © Hope Myers



Ardella Swanberg—Acrylic Painting

© Ardella Swanberg

Ardella Swanberg discovered two years ago that acrylic paints have change dramatically since she was forced to use them in a college class at the University of Minnesota in 1963. Ardella started using acrylics when she was hired to teach a class in oils and acrylics for Cuesta College in Cambria. They are absolutely wonderful. Almost as much fun as watercolor. She loves to paint plein air but also paints in the studio. A majority of her paintings are landscapes but she enjoys painting people and even abstracts too. To Ardella the important thing is not the media that you use—oil, acrylic or watercolor, but how you design the painting and the energy you put into it.

© Ardella Swanberg
© Ardella Swanberg